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New entrant in phototherapy: Nanoparticles for stimulating and monitoring the heating processes in living cells

19 Jul | By Valentin Milichko
New entrant in phototherapy: Nanoparticles for stimulating and monitoring the heating processes in living cells
New approach based on interaction of light with an all-dielectric nanoparticle allows stimulating and controlling the heating processes in living cells at the nanometer scale.
Image source: The authors ordered a unique figure from the designer (Shalaeva Anastasia)
By: Valentin A. Milichko, Mikhail V. Zyuzin

Suggesting an idea of harnessing light to stimulate and remote control the heating processes in cells, the Researchers from ITMO University developed the smart nanoparticles, which are able to absorb the light and precise convert it to the heat, as well as simultaneously provide the information on the local temperature and conformation of surrounding molecules for biomedical applications.

Generally, plasmonic nanoparticles are used as a heating source for phototherapy and cancer treatment. In this case, interplay between parameters of incoming light (power and wavelength) and geometry of the nanoparticles (size and shape) is important for efficient heating. Meanwhile, such kind of poorly controlled process remains hidden. To overcome this, the Researches have to utilize different supplementary techniques (photoluminescence) and nanometer scale objects as nanodiamonds and carbon nanowires for controlling and understanding of the heating process.  

In the series of articles, published by Wiley and ACS in 2018/19, the Researchers from ITMO University suggested an alternative idea of utilizing new family of dielectric nanoparticles made of silicon, germanium and iron oxide for controllable heating (up to 1200 K), monitoring the local temperature (with an error of 0.4 K) and protein conformation in real time. In contrast to plasmonic nanoparticles, new approach is based on interplay between the parameters of incoming/outcoming light and size/composition of the nanoparticles. On the one hand, the merging of size and incoming light wavelength results in an efficient resonant heating to temperatures higher than for plasmonic nanoparticles. On the other hand, the outcoming light from nanoparticles and surroundings analyzed by Raman scattering provides the information about the local temperature and protein conformation. The former is due to intrinsic temperature dependent Raman frequencies for the nanoparticles (in contrast to metals); the latter is due to enhanced Raman scattering caused by optical field localization. The control of the heating is achieved by monitoring the temperature in real time with the possibility to tune it by laser intensity simultaneously.

The series of these works open a new way for utilizing multifunctional nanoparticles for phototherapy with a powerful feedback. Moreover, the Researchers from ITMO University utilized the efficient heating of the nanoparticles by light for intensively developing area such as drug delivery. In this case, the nanoparticles appear as heat agents, which are able to induce non-invasive controlled cargo (phalloidin, wheat germ agglutinin, tubulin, propidium iodide, dexamethasone, ceftriaxone) release from polymer capsules inside carcinoma and stem cells at the right moment and place. Intriguing is that the drug can be released from an individual capsule inside the individual cell with remote control and optical feedback. The non-toxicity, biocompatibility, and multifunctionality of such the nanoparticles make them promising for future application in biophotonics and medicine.  

 

Contact and further information:

Valentin A. Milichko (v.milichko@metalab.ifmo.ru)

Mikhail V. Zyuzin (mikhail.zyuzin@metalab.ifmo.ru)

 

Related journal article:

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/jbio.201700322

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/lpor.201700227

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/chem.201706135

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsami.8b09810

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/chem.201706135

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsami.8b09810

 

 


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